PROTO TYPE FOR EVERYTHING

WEATHERING

The experimental locomotives of the 1950s and 1960s carried some astonishing liveries. In everyday service, however, they looked very different to how they came across in manufacturers’ publicity shots. TIM SHACKLETON shows how a bit of subtle weathering can make all the difference.

My aim in every aspect of modelling is to present everything looking as close to reality as possible. Kestrel was used for some months on coal workings from the Worksop area and here, on Roy Jackson’s magnificent ‘EM’ gauge layout (HM100), the beast takes the Gainsborough line through Retford with a long rake of 16ton minerals bound for March.

AN AURA OF MYSTERY still surrounds the various privately commissioned diesel locomotives that ran on British Railways in the transition era of the 1950s and 1960s. Not many people will have seen them in the flesh, and only the prototype Deltic still exists (although Kestrel, amazingly, was lying semi-dismantled at a workshop just south of Moscow until the early 1990s).

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