Railway History

RAILWAY HISTORY

Join us and delve into the archives to discover the stories of locomotive classes large and small, learn how the railway worked, and why it was built in this amalgamation of the popular Reality Check and Railway Realism sections from Hornby Magazine.

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BRITISH RAILWAYS Western Region

Chocolate and cream, lined green 4-6-0s, Brunel’s ‘billiard table’ and the torturous grades of the South Devon Banks were just a few of the components of British Railways’ Western Region. MIKE WILD looks back at what made this region of British Railways different to all the rest.

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TRANS-PENNINE TRACTION

With its intense traffic levels, fearsome gradients and challenging timetabling, the north Trans-Pennine corridor has always held great interest for enthusiasts. Now services on this line are undergoing a radical upgrade, the latest in a series of improvements which have been continuously carried out since Victorian times, as EVAN GREEN-HUGHES discovers.

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The Somerset and Dorset Railway

Born by accident, financially insecure, difficult to operate and mostly unwanted throughout its existence, the Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway has nevertheless gained legendary status amongst enthusiasts and modellers alike. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES looks at what made this line so special and why it is so well remembered even today.

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The Collett ‘14XX’

No model of the quintessential Great Western branch line would be complete without one of that company’s little 0-4-2Ts and matching autocoach. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES traces the origins of this attractive tank engine back to the mid-19th century.

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The LBSCR's sprightly 'Terriers'

The ‘A1’ class of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway has a rich and varied history. To mark the arrival of Hornby’s new model EVAN GREEN-HUGHES looks back at its story.

Churchward 43XX Feature Premium

The Churchward ‘Moguls’

Although many steam locomotives were designed for both passenger and freight traffic, few had the success of the Great Western’s ‘43XX’ class, a design that was to be the company’s maid of all work for more than half a century. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES explains all.

GWR '61XX' 2-6-2T Feature Premium

GWR '61XX' 2-6-2Ts

Although the Great Western Railway set out to produce a range of standard steam engines in the Churchward era, inevitably as time went on variants were produced for specific tasks. One of those were the ‘61XX’ 2-6-2Ts which were specifically provided for commuter services in London, as EVAN GREEN-HUGHES explains.