Railway History

RAILWAY HISTORY

Join us and delve into the archives to discover the stories of locomotive classes large and small, learn how the railway worked, and why it was built in this amalgamation of the popular Reality Check and Railway Realism sections from Hornby Magazine.

Feature Premium

Reality Check: The ‘Coronation Scot’

The 1930s saw remarkable advances in railway technology, which produced improved journey times and better comfort for travellers. One of the most progressive trains of this time was the London Midland & Scottish Railway’s ‘Coronation Scot’ - an initiative that war cut short, as EVAN GREEN-HUGHES explains.

HM168 Railway Realism Feature Premium

Railway Realism: Settle-Carlisle railway

Soaring high into the Pennines in spectacular scenery, the Settle & Carlisle Railway has always held a special place in the hearts of enthusiasts and modellers. However, this railway had a troubled history with threats to its existence from the very start. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES explains.

Feature Premium

Derby’s Class 25/3

Perhaps one of the most recognisable diesel locomotives of the 1960s was the popular and versatile Class 25, a design that reached its best with its final version, the 25/3, which first appeared in 1965, as EVAN GREEN-HUGHES describes.

Class 37/4 Reality Check Feature Premium

Electric Train Heat Class 37/4

EVAN GREEN-HUGHES

The Class 37 is nearing its 60th birthday and continues in daily use on the national network. One of the most useful variants is the ‘37/4’, which was upgraded to supply Electric Train Heat in the 1980s. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES looks at the development and life of this 31 strong sub-fleet.

EVAN GREEN-HUGHES
Feature Premium

EYE IN THE SKY

A modeller's Model railways are viewed from above in most circumstances, but how much do we really think about how the landscape around the line looks? TIM SHACKLETON takes to the air to discover how railways really interact with their surroundings.

Feature Premium

The Brush Class 31

One of the most recognisable and longest-lived of the Modernisation Plan diesel locomotives is the Brush Type 2, which later became much better known as the Class 31. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES examines this design, which despite its longevity has not been without its problems.

Feature Premium

Dining by Rail

Dining on the rails was once an essential part of long-distance travel, but now this facility is limited to very few routes alongside special or tourist trains. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES investigates how changing times have led to the demise of the restaurant car.

HM166 Reality Check Feature Premium

Thompson's ‘A2/2s’ and ‘A2/3s’

Although the ‘Pacifics’ of the LNER are generally considered to be some of the best-looking locomotives ever built, there was one batch of locomotives that defied this rule. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES and ANDREW RODEN look into the history of the ‘A2/2s’ and ‘A2/3s’ which, while they looked ungainly, were an intelligent response to wartime pressures.

Feature Premium

The GWR railcars

The Great Western Railway is more often remembered for its fleet of copper-capped chimney steam locomotives rather than for technological innovation - but in fact the company was amongst the first to introduce viable diesel traction, in the form of a series of self-propelled railcars, as EVAN GREEN-HUGHES explains.

Feature Premium

Vossloh’s Class 68

Although the Class 68 has been with us for only three years, it has already amassed a considerable following. EVAN GREEN-HUGHES takes a closer look at this handsome and groundbreaking locomotive, which is set to be an industry standard for many years to come.